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DECEMBER 2022

ALS genetic carrier finds value in EverythingALS study leveraging digital biomarkers as a means to create tools for early detection of ALS and potentially other neurological diseasese.

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DECEMBER 2022

New way to detect ALS; early diagnosis critical for treatment

LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — Every 90 minutes, someone gets diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. It’s a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord and there is no cure.

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NOVEMBER 2022

Woman's Husband's Health Journey Inspires Everything ALS

NBC10’s Erin Coleman speaks to Everything ALS founder Indu Navar about her husband’s own ALS diagnosis and how the group is working to better ALS research. You can help the fight through Everything ALS or at the 2022 Walk to Defeat ALS.

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NOVEMBER 2022

Walk to Defeat ALS happening in North Las Vegas

Indu Navar, founder of EverythingALS, joined us to talk about how your participation helps raise funds and awareness.

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NOVEMBER 2022

Non-profit conducts study to diagnose ALS quicker

LANSING, Mich. (WLNS) — In the 150 years since ALS was discovered there is still no cure or single test to diagnose the disease.

The demand for more answers is what drove one woman to start up her own non-profit.
EverythingALS began its research in 2021 and now they’re working toward diagnosing the disease faster.

“I really want to help people who are going through this disease,” said Indu Navar, Founder of EverythingALS.

The study analyzes data when it comes to physiological changes and the progression of the disease.

Navar says she wants to shift the focus to the brain, something she believes isn’t understood well enough.

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SEPTEMBER 2022

Q&A With Indu Navar, founder of Everything ALS

Indu Navar, founder of Everything ALS, speaks with Pharm Exec about how she lost her husband to the disease and how she's trying to improve the way its diagnosed.

 

Indu Navar

Diagnosing ALS is a difficult process for patients experiencing symptoms. After the death of her husband, tech entrepreneur Indu Navar founded Everything ALS, and organization she hopes will refine and improve the way ALS and other neurological conditions are diagnosed.

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OCTOBER 2022

New technology helping ALS patients in Louisiana

BATON ROUGE, La. (BRPROUD) — ALS, often called Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a progressive motor neuron disease that gradually robs people of their ability to walk, talk, swallow, and eventually breathe.

Indu Navar, the founder of EverythingALS, said, “ALS has no known cause or cure and so patients suffer for years not knowing what is wrong and have to go through rigorous testing and a process of elimination to finally get diagnosed. If they are diagnosed, there are no treatments. Life expectancy is two to five years.”

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SEPTEMBER 2022

EverythingALS Joins Forces with Aural Analytics, FeetMe, ZEPHYRx and Others for a First-Of-Its-Kind ALS Research Study

SAN FRANCISCO (PRWEB) SEPTEMBER 19, 2022

EverythingALS, a patient-focused non-profit that brings together people living with ALS, caregivers, physicians, researchers, and pharmaceutical companies to collaborate on an open innovation platform using cutting-edge technologies and data science to improve progression measurements for neurological disease like Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), has initiated a new study, The Radcliff Study, with partners in the quest to find a diagnosis, treatment, and cure for ALS...

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AUGUST 2022

Groundbreaking research involving artificial intelligence could diagnose ALS patients sooner

Five thousand people in the U.S. are diagnosed with a neurological disease called ALS every year. Medical experts say it typically takes an average of two years to diagnose, but new research will likely make that timetable a lot shorter.

In 2019, Mark Weston and his wife, Kathleen, had their retirement all planned out.

"We were all set up for a sail off into the sunset and have a really fun retirement," Weston said. "We had, we bought a house on the coast of Maine several months earlier."

A week before the big move, he got a life-changing diagnosis.

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AUGUST 2022

NeuroSense Joins EverythingALS Open Innovation Consortium; Set to Enroll US and EU Patients in Phase IIb Study

NeuroSense's support will aid EverythingALS with ground-breaking patient research in a joint effort to develop treatments

LOS ALTOS, Calif. and CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Aug. 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- EverythingALS, a patient-focused non-profit that brings together patients, caregivers, physicians, researchers, and pharmaceutical companies using technological innovations and data science to support efforts to improve care for those living with a neurological disease like Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), today announced NeuroSense Therapeutics Ltd. (NASDAQ: NRSN) ("NeuroSense"), a company developing treatments for severe neurodegenerative diseases, as a new collaborator in the effort to identify treatments and a cure for ALS.

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AUGUST 2022

‘Death by 1,000 cuts:’ How emerging tech could change the journey for ALS patients

EverythingALS aims to speed drug development through improved diagnostics.

in 2016, Indu Navar’s husband, Peter Cohen, experienced the first symptom of what turned out to be amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive degenerative disease commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

EverythingALS founder Indu Navar

Permission granted by EverythingALS/Indu Navar

 “His foot was just acting weird,” says Navar, who founded the California nonprofit EverythingALS two years ago. “We didn’t know where to go, so we went to a chiropractor,” she says.

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JULY 2022

Healthbeat: New ALS research driven by patient-focused non-profit

SCRANTON, LACKAWANNA COUNTY— New research is underway to better understand and treat ALS, a difficult disease to diagnose with no known cure. ALS patient Paul Miller of Scranton is one of the participants.

The progressive neurodegenerative disease ALS affects as many as 30,000 Americans. There is no known cure despite efforts to better understand it and treat it.

ALS is a puzzling disease for certain with so much needing to be learned about it.

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TOMMY EDWARD CULPEPPER,Jr
MOVIE CONNOISSEUR

JULY 2022

Bentonville man works to help diagnose ALS sooner

 A Bentonville man is dedicating his life to advocating for people with ALS and trying to help diagnose the disease sooner.

“I’m a movie connoisseur,” said Tommy Edward Culpepper, Jr. “I love movies.”

For Culpepper, movies have always been his saving grace. Even when he was a kid growing up in St. Louis, Missouri.

“I grew up in the Peabody Projects and the home environment wasn’t the greatest,” he said. “Star Wars, Blade Runner, Highlander. Movies like that are excellent getaways for me.”

Until he found himself in a nightmare that started in the doctor’s office...

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JULY 2022

These 2 Surprising Traits May Predict ALS, New Research Says

How ALS researchers are using an intriguing tool to learn keys of this disease that has at times taken years to diagnose. Plus, one woman's story of why she agreed to participate in this research

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sometimes called Lou Gherig’s disease, or ALS) affects around 15,000 Americans, with about 5,000 receiving a new diagnosis each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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JUNE 2022

Continue that momentum from the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge by getting involved in a unique study - New Day NW

Researchers want every American to start recording their voice daily. They believe this data could be used to eventually develop cures for ALS. #newdaynw

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MAY 2022

Patients giving voice to ALS research

Back in 2014, millions of people poured icy water over their heads to spread ALS awareness and support research for the devastating neurodegenerative disease.

Now tech developers want to hear your voices. 

Brian Andre has been living with ALS for six years.

“On average they only give you 2 to 5 years of life after diagnosis and some progress very quickly,” he said. “I’m really in a very small percentage of patients who see little or no progression. … My weakness is in my left side, left leg and arm. So it throws my gait off.”

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INDU NAVAR,
CEO - EVERYTHINGALS

MAY 2022

Live At 9: Researchers Collecting Audio and Video to Help ALS Detection

Remember the summer Americans took time to dump buckets of ice water on their heads to help fight the deadly disease ALS? This summer, there’s a more comfortable way to help researchers learn about ALS and other neurological disorders. Researchers want people to record their voices and upload them for study.

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